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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,640 (some duplicates have been removed)
.s. law affecting disabled kids. but the treaty would not change u.s. law. in fact, there's no precedent that we can find that any u.n. treaty has ever changed u.s. law. we'll dig deeper on that in a moment. after the vote, cnn asked senator john kerry about santorum's claims. here's what he said. >> i have great respect for both rick and his wife karen and their daughter and their family. he's a strong family man. but he either simply hasn't read the treaty or doesn't understand it, or he was just not factual in what he said because the united nations has absolutely zero -- zero, i mean zero ability to order or to tell or to -- i mean, they can suggest, but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. >> it's not just democrats saying that. in a moment you'll hear from a republican who says the exact same thing. former u.s. attorney dick thornburgh. but the big question that we've been trying to figure out is why? why the flip-flopping and the no-voting based on, as far as we can tell, a boatload of misinformation. well, it turns out i
. michigan today became the 24th state to enact so-called right-to-work laws. much like the michigan senate last week, along party lines the house approved right-to-work legislation which prohibits unions from requiring members to pay dus. without hesitation earlier this evening, governor snyder signed the bill into law. there is a simple reason that laws like the one signed earlier are bad policy and bad economics. there's nothing wrong with a tough negotiation between a governor and labor unions or between a ceo and his workers. economic reality has to drive such negotiations. when i was governor, i negotiated hard but change the rules so workers cannot be effectively represented by a union takes away a fundamental right of workers to be represented on matters central to their economic well-being. it is one thing to be tough in negotiations, it is quite another to destroy the capacity of the union to negotiate at all. by slowly bleeding funds away from the union that's exactly what these bills do. this is not about
closed doors on these changes to the law before they were introduced in statehouses across the country. >> the united states of alec. and perfidious and passionate poetry from philip appleman. >> money buys prophets and teachers, poems and art. so, listen, if you're so rich, why aren't you smart? >> funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york. celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fl
any other u.n. treaty that has forced changes in u.s. law? >> i didn't come prepared to cite supreme court precedent on this point but it's a well -- >> what you're saying is totally hypothetical. you're using a bunch of hypotheticals saying this is going to force abortion rights for disabled people overseas. i mean, some groups are saying children with glasses are going be taken from their parents. you're using all these very scary hypotheticals. you can't even cite one case where a u.n. treaty has ever impacted u.s. law? >> not aware of one person who is saying children with glasses are going to be taken away from their parents. the article 7 concern from the treaty relates to the best interests of the child would be injected into the decision of how to care for a disabled child. historically in the united states -- >> again, you can't name one u.n. treaty that has ever had an impact on u.s. law? >> well, i can't name one u.s. treaty that has been the deciding factor in a decision. it may well happen. i didn't come prepared to cite supreme court precedent. >> about the eyeglass cla
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
'll play his response. >>> still ahead tonight, you better stop textin texting. if the government and law enforcement has their way, they may live on for years. we'll exa abou examine about hog brother is about to impede your right of speech. >>> egypt is now burning. where is sandra flack. you don't think that makes sense? the muslim brotherhood are about to trample all over women's rights. where are the women up in arms about the so-called war on women. they stand in silence now. why? ♪ [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> it has become a familiar scene. egyptian citizens flooding the streets demanding their inalienabl
huston, who has had served as a speaker of the ohio house and senate and finally, michael pitz, a law professor and expert in voting rights and related matters. he is an attorney in the voting rights the sector of with the justice department. >> good afternoon, everyone. it is good to be here and i must say i was here four years ago and honored to be back again and have the opportunity. we are talking about insuring integrity and access and i was asked to talk about what va. -- west wets -- what west virginia does. west virginia does have identification laws and many of them follow what many other states to as far as when it comes to the health of america voted act. i will give you a brief of what it takes. since we had our discussions today, this is a very bad thing from what i am understanding. i am trying to get rid of this in west virginia. this is your mail in voter registration application. this costs about $6 and i would like to be able to have on-line registration. the help america vote act -- if you register by mail and not provide some kind of photo identification, you have
communities? and i think perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is
that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
state to enact such a law preventing them from acquiring membership and dues. it's an important strike at organized labor in a strong union state. nearly in five workers are unionized. the massive protests with 12,000 strong reflect a backlash to what's happening in other parts of the country. it's not just wisconsin or ohio. they have become the latest scott walker. >> this guy who really looks pleasant enough, maybe it won't be so bad. the phrase right to work is a positive and up living message. can it do to unions? the law probably strengthens unions. >> if this is a right to work state, it makes it illegal for unions and employers to man tateidate that employees be part of the union or pay money to that union. >> or destroy when they have to stay afloat. one or the other. >> kagy gray is the reporter for the detroit free press and joins us now. this happened very quickly. it looks like we have not seen the end of this fight. democrats and union activists and anybody who supports the unions about finding a way to overturn this. they have three options and is to pursue a legal chall
that, tonight, is law. you would not know it watching the boisterouunion protests, but unions are left intact by this new law. as is, the right to collective bargaining. the big victory for worker rights today, the elimination of the power of both public and private nions to demand and a worse dues from workers and the end of union power to force workers to pay what have been mandatory dues. michigan becomes the 24th state to enact right to work laws after legislation passed the state house of representaves and was sent on to governor rick snyder for his signature. protesters of this new law number some 10,000 at today's demonstrations. most league made up of uaw union of the workers, machinists, teachers, sometimes angry crowds that seem to be taking cues frm their democratic leaders. one group described by those on the ground as a mob chanting and gohome while tearing down a conservative activist group tent. a member of that mob scene right here. this as protesters are heard in the background treatening the police with violence. here he is trying to plead with pro union protesters to
consistent in domestic violence investigation; there was a time when law enforcement only focused on investigation. chief suhr recognize importance of having advocacy groups located directly in the special victims unit. family can meet with investigators and have access to services in the system as they move forward. with the efforts of kathy black and -- svu has a children's room available which offers a safe environment for children exposed to family violence. child abuse is one of the toughest crimes for investigators. children are among the most vulnerable victims. thankfully there are those like kathy baxter who are constantly fighting for the prevention of child abuse. i believe partnership with outside agencies have allowed us to find justice during this complex investigation. another important component of svu is the -- unit. those members solely on internet crimes against children. the cases are complex and require persistent and dedication to identify and locate perpetrators who possess and distribute child pornography. we are only one of many law enforc
in the city, so there is sort of a very, kind of, unique law and relationship around these convenience zones. the crv redempt zones and how they are created and how the state law require that they are managed and facilitated and what this means to small business. so i want to put forward some proactive policy recommendations so that we're being ahead of the curve and not waiting until this may become an issue down the road for small businesses. so i just wanted to just make that clear. this is a policy discussion for you to take a look at, make recommendations. the commission can take action tonight, if it's comfortable or wait until the next commission meeting or two commission meetings. it's at your discretion to make sure that you are comfortable with the policy that is flushed out to be put forward to our policymakers in the city. so i just wanted to make sure that you understood that it's agendized as an action item tonight, but we do that as pro forma, as part of agendizing anything that the commission may be taking action on in case you want to take action tonight, but that is not n
college in maine, he also went to uc- berkeley law school and finished in 1978. he and his wife have two daughters. i also want to mention, prior to becoming mayor, one of the key points in his contributions to the community is after he completed law school, he worked as a managing attorney for the san francisco asian law caucus, where he was an advocate for affordable housing and the rights of immigrants and renters. mayor lee -- [applause] >> thank you. welcome to city hall. the people's city hall, san francisco. i want you all to note that that was such a wonderful rendition of our national anthem. please give another applause to the millennium -- melanie and her daughter. i am so excited about all of you and seen so many of you from all over our state. come to city hall anin san francisco, welcome. i would like to welcome the former secretary of transportation. [applause] thank you for being here. thank you, john, thank you. our board of supervisors comment david chiu, thank you very much. david campos, thank you for being here. he is our adopted asian brother. we have so many of our
to have violated the law. here's one finding the rent board to have violated the law. here's another oneçhc san francisco police commission to have violated the p here's another one finding the police commission to have violated the law. here's one finding the library commission to have violated the law. here's a referral for enforcement to the ethics commission. here's another order finding( uñ louise herrera to have violated the here's the referral to the district attorney regarding that matter,úz%( +p here's a referral to the ethics commissioñcjsú regarding that meter. here's a referral to the city attorney regarding thatc ; office. here's another case findingtb city attorney'sd violation. here's another referral, and a directive to all city agencies and finally, the latest one another violation ofah%(ú library of the law maybe if this board of supervisors would quit whining about the task force and telling city agencies that the law requires them to obey the sunshine ordinance, and they(4 gwñ all
, michigan. massive crowds gathering at the state capitol. they're protesting the state's right to work law. the lawmakers set to cast the final votes inside that building this morning. we understand the governor is very ready to sign that into law. very controversial situation going on live in lansing. good morning, everybody, i'm martha maccallum. you are here in america's nice room. >> i'm gregg jarrett in for bill gregg: the right to work vote will mean unions will no longer force workers to pay dues. that the birthplace of the powerful united auto workers union. martha: this has huge national implications over the power of organized labor. governor rick snyder believes there will be more job. he believes the protests hurt more than they help. here he is. >> if you go forward you will create a environment involving labor issues this could rise to the lebl level where i might not keep it off my agenda. i'm not happy about being in this situation. >> he has the responsibility as our leader avoiding this kind of a cliff. it is not, it is not good enough to be for him to say liks behind us.
donkey, or lack thereof. i love the picture. it reminded me of a priceless letter he sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
been attacking her as not conservative enough for the seat. crossroads president steven law told politico, quote, it is distasteful to see washington politicos clubbing republican candidates right out of the gate, especially ones with the guts to challenge an entrenched incumbent and who enjoy the broad base of support that shelley moore capito seems to have. or jim demint said he'd rather have 30 conservative republicans in the senate than 60 who don't believe in anything. karl rove would probably rather have 60 republicans in the senate no matter what they believe. that is going to be the fight. that is the battle line in the republican party right now. the guys who want purity, more tea party, versus the guys who want a supermajority. no more obama cares. heritage versus crossroads. karl rove versus jim demint. pass me the popcorn. joining me, dave weigel of "slate" and msnbc contributor. dave, it is good to see you here tonight. >> good to see you, ezra. >> so is this what it kind of looks like? do you see demint and heritage as consolidating power here and making, and vying
the law? well, let's consider the 14th amendment. nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property without due process of law nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protections of the laws. and here is justice kennedy, anthony kennedy, in his majority opinion in the lawrence case of 2003 which declared anti-sodomy laws unconstitutional. quote, does a statute making it a crime for two persons of the same sex to engage in certain intimate sexual conduct violate the due process clause? yes. a statute making it a crime for two persons of the same sex to engage in certain intimate sexual conduct violates the due process law. quote, liberty protects the person from unwarranted government intrusions. freedom extends upon spatial bounds. liberty presumes an autonomy of self that includes freedom of thought, belief, expression, and certain intimate conduct. the defendants are adults, and their conduct was in private and consensual, and, quote, to declare the issue as one related to the right to engage in certain sexual conduct demeans the claim the individual
fraud we had 235 cases that we had identified before we put this photo i.d. law in place. in this last election the photo i.d. law which as you mentioned is the one of the toughest in the country worked well. 2.2 million cast ballots. of those only 838 forgot to bring a photo i.d. to the polls. that et cetera fewer than 1 in 1,000 voters. they were giive provisional ballots. they came n the vote of election and make their vote out. to date we are not finding anyone who actually didn't have a photo i.d. the bottom line is it's a common sense easy way to prevent some forms of voter fraud and it is a fact that exists. voter fraud is very real in the america. >> you said 235 claims of voter fraud who is making this allegations. >> he'll 235 verified cases been reported between 1997 and 2010. >> and you so -- so you had reported to whom by whom? are they real? are you sure of that? >> yeah. well, and these reported to the county clerks and the cases that couldn't be, you know, were not credible were not included. credible reports of voter fraud to the county clerks or to the secretary of st
we may not know in any particular case whether a person is an automoton, usually you can. the law has a bright line. it says if you engage in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do
. it is not often that legal services organizations get to regularly meet with law enforcement and learn about their experience. i really appreciate officer hall who is also in eric chang's position; our organization has been involved with this commission for six years. while we have made lots of progress distilled is appointed that on a regular basis, almost every day, i will talk to someone who said that they did not know that they could have an interpreter. they were not offered an interpreter. they did not even get to speak to the police officer on the scene because there was no interpreter or they have to wait an hour or something along those lines and when you think about for survivor, even if they know they will get to have an interpreter, if they have to wait whether an hour or 45 minutes and during that time the officer is talking probably to the abusive partner, it changes the dynamic. the police come in but they're not always 100 percent sure that calling the police in the situation is going to be the most successful route. and then you have is a situation where t
with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forward to the rest of the day, i appreciate your presence and i appreciate your leadership
and we decided that we would call it seth's law in honor of her, she had been in and around sacramento for a long time. so the legislation in and of itself, i don't think it's going to work miracles, but it is definitely on people's radar now and i think you hear it in the media more and more. the reason we have a suicide barrier and the reason we are having legislation like this is because of the parents and the families because they are the ones that hurt the most and i would imagine part of the therapeutic thing, you've got to tell this story and telling it in the right place and the right time can be very effective. so seth's law does require that if you witness an act of bullying, that you must report it. >> is that for anybody? >> anyone, but particularly teachers. there is a -- sometimes we see things that aren't very pleasant and if you've ever taken it to muni, you know what i mean. your tendency is to turn away. i heard the word faggot on the play ground when i taught. the teachers were intimidated, they didn't want to be seen to have any empathy because that might refle
have said that there are already laws in the books that cover this situation. that is simply not the case. which i whies berkeley, san joÉe and other california cities have their own public nudity restriction beyond the if there were already laws in place to address this situation, i would not have introduced this legislation. public nudity, currently, is not -- is legal in san francisco, other than in our parks, port, and in restaurants. there's been a suggestion that we should use lewd behavior laws, particularly the indecent exposure provisions of the california penal code. i don't agree with that. i think that using lewd behavior laws is problematic and ineffective. first of all, there are going to be a lot of borderline cases about whether something is lewd or not lewd and you're putting a police officer in a terrible position of trying to determine is this person a little bit aroused or not aroused, is that adornment on the person's genitals lewd or not lewd, did he shake his genitals a little too vigorously to draw attention. no police officer should make that determi
in the united states. they are laws to protect the privacy of patients. what the nurse receptionist did in telling the callers what the condition of the patient was, you know, she had rest all the rest of it that would be impermissible in the united states. and the fact that it was the duke duchess of cambridge i think maybe makes it more egregious. pranks you and i do radio. we have -- you know, sometimes we have fun doing it. but to do it at someone else's expense in this regard is just horrible. now, something said that. i think to pin the suicide of the woman on the radio dj's is really farfetched. i spoke to some doctors today who told me that when someone is bound do kill themselves. the call may be the trigger but something else. to leave a husband and two small children behind there had to be something going on in this poor woman's head. this thing pushed her over the edge. >> laura: geraldo, it's part of the whole problem we have right now. we have a lot of problems in this country. this culture where the more outrageous or the more, i don't know, profane or the more you debase
and workers are standing at the precipice of. with me is syracuse university law professor and pulitzer prize investigative reporter, david johnson, who provides details on how big corporations use plain english to rob you blind. in his book, "the fine print." loretta sanchez, carmin wong-ulrich, and matt welch. so nice to have you all at the table. >> good morning. >> thank you. good morning. >>> david, i stole that cyborg a bit from your text. i thought it was useful. if we are going to call them people, the kind of people they are is not immoral but amoral, interested only in profits but willing to work with the law but in a ray that erodes what our capacities are. play that out for me. >> society is defined by its rules. what we have been doing quietly and without the news media covering it is rewriting the rules. the rules of competition are being thwarted or repealed. everyone in america has had a legal right to the telephone. you have to pay for it. that's been repealed in six. they can say, sorry, we are not going to serve you. >> i think the language has been about this $2,000. if we
that you trust is going to give you real information and support the kinds of laws that they're supporting rather than one that's maybe a bill posed by the industry that, guess what, wants to be self-regulating. okay, so now we are moving to the driveway, and this is really interesting because we think about low emissions cars as being really important for maybe climate change but they also might be important for breast cancer because when fuel is burning and you guys are familiar with chemicals that, you know, come bust, lower emissions vehicle, one that's more efficient may reduce these pah's in our air and especially in urban areas reduce exposures to those compounds which is really pornts, so thinking about hybrid or electric, we're all lucky enough to take public transit and reduce those overall exposures or -- yeah? >> i believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly th
massachusetts and i differ on most of these treaties, with the same disagreement on the law of the sea treaty. the question is in my opinion is their sovereignty of believe infringed upon our sovereignty and with that i yield the floor. >> mr. president, i yield five minutes. to the senator from illinois. >> by methinks senator kerry, senator mccain, senator lugar and so many others who have put this matter to the floor. it was 22 years ago when a historic event took place on the fourth united states senate which changed the united states of america. 20 years ago we passed the americans with disabilities act and reset a disability should not disqualify you for them at you in terms of their opportunity as an american. for some people said this is obvious. everyone knows. it was also obvious was discrimination taking place all across this great land. we remove that barrier to discrimination and in passing the americans with disabilities act can we step forward at the nation. with their fear and concern? i can recall going to greene county in rural illinois and marketing to carrollton and the ci
. smith: mr. speaker, h.r. 6620, the former presidents protection act of 2012, amends federal law to uniformerly provide lifetime secret service protection to all of america's former presidents. i want to thank the gentleman from south carolina, mr. gowdy, and the gentleman from virginia, mr. scott, for sponsoring this commonsense bipartisan legislation. america has a responsibility to protect its presidents and its families and not simply while they serve in office. we also have a duty to ensure the ongoing safety of those who serve in america's highest elected office after they leave office. in 1958 congress first authorized secret service protection for former presidents, which was limited to a reasonable period of time after a president leaves office. congress expanded this to lifetime protection in 1965. but in 1994, congress once again limited secret service protection for former presidents. this time to 10 years after a president leaves office. this 10-year restriction applied to presidents who took office after january 1, 1997. the role of the former president has changed
to tell her story. in carson city. >> he is one of the toughest law men in the west and probably the most politically polarizing. some san francisco students made that clear when they wrote to sheriff joe about his hard line immigration stance. he planned to answer them in person today but that never happened. cbs 5 recorder linda yee asked the questions instead. >> reporter: he's america's toughest sheriff. joe admits he courts controversy. >> welcome to san francisco. >> reporter: he got a dose of that when drag queens invaded his dinner party. the sheriff is in town for a convention. he hoped to reach out to eighth graders at a middle school who sent him letters. students wrote in spanish their disagreement with his fight against illegal immigrants and his tent prisons in the desert sun. >> they called may racist. i just wanted to meet with the kids and tell them the truth. >> reporter: he had to set the set the kids straight but the district canceled the meeting. the rep said she was too busy but denied there ever was a meeting. the sheriff defends arizona law that allows his deputies
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,640 (some duplicates have been removed)